Women and Alcoholism

woman sitting on floor drinking wine showing women and alcoholism

Historically, women were not assumed to engage in alcohol abuse as much as men. But all that has changed. According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, approximately 46% of women drink and 2.5% of them are alcoholics. Women and alcoholism has become rampant as more and more women engage in social and binge drinking.

It is important to attend alcohol detox or reduce the quantity of alcohol one consumes. This is because many people often don’t realize when they begin to drink excessively. The 2 or 3 glasses of wine you drink every night might turn into 6 or 7 overtime. This is often the slippery slope that leads to alcohol dependence.

Effects of Alcohol on Women

The effects of alcohol on women are more severe because of their body weight. This means that due to the lower body weight in women, alcohol may remain in their blood for a longer period. This makes it easier to suffer more side effects from alcohol use and even become more prone to addiction. Women and alcoholism don’t mix very well.

Some of the effects of alcohol on women include:

  • Dehydration
  • Increased risk of sexual assault
  • Increased risk of infertility
  • May negatively disrupt the menstrual cycle
  • Drinking during pregnancy may lead to Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders
  • Increased risk of breast cancer

Women are also more prone to suffering from liver diseases, heart complication and shrinking of the brain. As the primary caregivers of the community, the impact alcohol has on women is far-reaching. This externalizes the effects of alcohol abuse on children.

Risk Factors That May Expose Women to Alcoholism

The number of women suffering from alcoholism has steadily increased in the past decade. The risk factors for alcohol addiction among women include increased stress, poverty, lack of education, genetic factors, and depression.

Alcohol poses various health risks to women and alcoholism only exacerbates this situation. If you or any woman you know is an alcoholic, help them get alcohol addiction treatment.

Alcohol Detox

Detoxification is the first step towards rehabilitation. When an alcoholic doesn’t have a drink for more than six hours, they may begin experiencing withdrawal symptoms. This is usually caused by the body’s realization that there is no alcohol in the blood.

When the withdrawal symptoms kick in, the alcoholic begins to go through detox. This process may be quite challenging as the symptoms may become much worse. That’s why it’s important to seek professional help.

Programs for Treating Alcoholism at Summit Detox Center

Summit Detox is a great facility, which offers great programs to get you through any detoxification process. Some of the detox programs on offer include:

  • Alcohol detox program: This program is for patients primarily suffering from alcohol addiction.
  • Medical detox program: This program is great for treating patients who may experience very severe withdrawal symptoms. The program may involve the use of closely-monitored medication to manage the symptoms.
  • Outpatient and inpatient care program: This arrangement suits the patient’s convenience depending on their condition. The patient has the choice to stay or receive specialized care while at home.

Although men have been the main focus of many intervention programs for alcoholics, Summit Detox has put in place measures to ensure that women and alcoholism becomes an issue of the past.

Put Women and Alcoholism in the Past

Women and alcoholism have become one of the most talked-about topics in today’s society. Don’t let alcoholism ruin your future. Whether it’s you, your sister, or someone you care about, make the first step to getting help. You can do this when you contact us by calling 866.341.0638.

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