What Are Benzos?

woman taking benzo pill without knowing What Are Benzos

What are benzos? They are a synthetic medication that relaxes the nerves in the central nervous system. The primary function of benzos is to reduce the symptoms associated with seizures, anxiety, panic attacks, or similar conditions. A doctor may prescribe benzos to a person who suffers from excessive activity in the brain or nervous system.

Benzos are designed to be a short-term solution for these conditions. They are often used as a supplement to counseling or therapy. However, due to their addictive properties, clients who use these drugs may attempt to increase their dosage or use the drugs longer than intended.

Let’s find out more about benzos and benzo addiction treatment in Florida.

What Conditions Do Benzos Treat?

Although benzos are often associated with treating anxiety, doctors also prescribe them for other mental or health conditions such as:

  • Premenstrual syndrome issues
  • Status epilepticus
  • Alcohol withdrawal
  • Insomnia
  • Seizures
  • Muscle spasms
  • Nervousness/panic disorders

In some instances, doctors may use benzos to calm a patient before or during surgery. Benzos are effective in treating the symptoms of a generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), social anxiety disorder, and panic disorder. The drugs are so effective at treating the symptoms of these conditions, that users can quickly become addicted to them.

Side Effects of Benzodiazepines

Benzos are a powerful sedative that can cause numerous side effects, including:

  • Fatigue
  • Reduced libido
  • Dry mouth
  • Weight gain
  • Constipation
  • Nausea/vomiting
  • Changes in appetite or sleep

Some users may experience memory impairment, sedation, confusion, or drowsiness. Serious side effects of benzos may include increased heart rate, severe low blood pressure, seizures, dependency, or respiratory depression. If you or a loved one experiences any of these side effects, you should consult your doctor or visit the emergency room.

Benzos and Alcohol

Many people who use benzos also drink alcohol. This is a combination of substances that can cause side effects as light as minor comfort and as serious as fatalities. Doctors and treatment specialists at benzo detox centers in South Florida recommend that you refrain from drinking alcohol or using any other drugs if you are using benzos.

When combined with alcohol, the effects of benzos are either strengthened, weakened, or compounded. For instance, a person who takes benzos and drinks can suffer from respiratory depression. They may also experience nervousness, heart problems, or go into a coma.

Benzos and Addiction

Benzos are habit-forming for two main reasons. First, they alter brain function and produce feelings of relaxation and pleasure. This chemical reaction is highly addictive because the user wants to continue feeling the way they do when they are on the drug. Second, the effects of benzos wear off as the body becomes tolerant to the drug. When the effects wear off, a person may request a higher dosage or seek benzos from a source outside of their doctor. As they increase the dosage, they start a pattern that ends up becoming an addiction and turns into full-blown dependency.

Benzo addiction is difficult to stop. A person who has been using benzos for a long time typically requires professional help from a medical detox program. Medication-assisted treatment (MAT) at a detox center can reduce the withdrawal symptoms and cravings that occur during detox. With professional help, a person has a fighting chance to overcome their addiction and transition into recovery.

Learn More About Benzo Abuse at Summit Detox

Summit Detox offers comprehensive detox services from all types of addictions. To find out more about our detox treatment center in South Florida, contact Summit Detox by calling 866.341.0638. We can help you get started on the road to recovery from benzo addiction.

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