What Are the Dangers of Fentanyl?

hand with syringe and pills showing the Dangers of Fentanyl

Fentanyl is in a class of drugs known as opioids. Developed in 1960, doctors prescribe fentanyl to patients who suffer from chronic pain due to terminal illness. Although fentanyl is an effective drug, it is also addictive and dangerous. Regardless, many users are unaware of the dangers of fentanyl. It is only after going to the ER for an overdose or a visit to a South Florida detox center for addiction that a person realizes how dangerous fentanyl truly is.

If you have an addiction to fentanyl, now is the time to get professional help at a treatment center. With the right detox and treatment, you can overcome your addiction before it is too late. Let’s take a closer look at the dangers of fentanyl and why you need to stop using it. If you have any further questions, feel free to contact Summit Detox at 866.341.0638.

What Is Fentanyl?

Fentanyl is an opioid that is similar to morphine, heroin, and methadone. It is often injected into the body intravenously, which allows it to act quickly. For patients with chronic pain, a doctor may prescribe a fentanyl patch that is worn on the body throughout the day.

Although fentanyl was designed for medicinal use, it has become a popular drug for recreational use due to its high potency. In its medicinal form, fentanyl is known as Actiq, Duragesic, or Sublimaze. In its recreational form, fentanyl is referred to as Tango & Cash, Murder 8, Jackpot, Goodfellas, Friend, Dance Fever, China White, China Girl, or Apache.

How Is Fentanyl Used Recreationally?

When used for recreation, the most common form of fentanyl is powder. This synthetic form is dropped onto blotter paper, added to nasal sprays or droppers, or made into pills that are identical to prescription medication. It is difficult to tell the difference between fentanyl and other opioids.

Some drug distributors combine fentanyl with other drugs to increase their potency. Users may take heroin, cocaine, MDMA, or methamphetamines that have been laced with fentanyl. Many of the users may do so unknowingly. As a result, they overdose on the drug.

The Dangers of Fentanyl

As more people discover fentanyl, they are experiencing the dangers of the drug first-hand. Over the last decade, opioid and opiate detox centers in Florida have seen an increase in clients seeking help for fentanyl addiction. Overdoses and fatalities have also spiked due to the illegal mass distribution of fentanyl.

Fentanyl’s potency is what makes it dangerous. Consider this: the potency of opioids is often measured by comparing them to morphine. For example, methadone is three times stronger than morphine. Heroin is five times stronger than morphine. By comparison, fentanyl is 100 times stronger than morphine.

Fentanyl’s potency makes it far more lethal, yet more popular. Ironically, the demand for fentanyl has not caused the price to skyrocket. Its potency keeps the price low. Keep in mind that the demand is not for the drug itself. Instead, users purchase other drugs that contain fentanyl.

Side Effects of Fentanyl

One of the most common long-term side effects of fentanyl is addiction. A person can get instantly hooked on fentanyl after using it the first time. The addiction is so strong that a user needs professional help from an opiate and opioid detox program to get off the drug. Other side effects of fentanyl include:

  • Loss of appetite
  • Diarrhea
  • Headache
  • Increased sweating
  • Trouble sleeping
  • Fatigue
  • Skin irritation

Serious side effects include breathing problems, low blood pressures, abdomen pains, or increased heart rate.

Learn More About the Dangers of Fentanyl at Summit Detox

Despite the dangers of fentanyl, you can get help for your addiction today. Summit Detox offers treatment for addiction at our fentanyl detox center in South Florida. Contact Summit Detox at 866.341.0638 to get started with your treatment today.

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