Benzo Addiction and Detox

senior holding a mixture of pills in hand wondering about benzo addiction and detox

Benzodiazepines, commonly known as benzos, are a class of prescription drugs that depress the central nervous system (CNS). As CNS depressants, benzos are primarily used as sedatives and tranquilizers to slow brain activity. Doctors most often prescribe benzos for sleep disorders like insomnia or psychological disorders such as anxiety, panic attacks, and acute stress. With benzo addiction and detox centers to treat it, there is a solution to the side effects of benzo addiction.

Many people use benzos to relax or fall asleep if they are suffering from sleepless nights; however, common benzos like Xanax and Valium can be addicting if they are taken longer than prescribed. Usually, doctors prescribe benzos for two to four weeks, yet many people take them longer than they should because they become dependent on them. If you find yourself misusing benzodiazepine, experts at the prescription drug detox center provide confidential help.

According to the Centers for Disease Control, benzo abuse and deaths from overdose are steady on the rise in America. Benzos are most often are abused with alcohol and opioid painkillers and they accounted for 30 percent of the 22,767 prescription-related overdose deaths in 2013.

Signs of Benzo Addiction

If you are taking benzos longer than prescribed or non-prescribed, you will notice that you’ll start to crave the drug more and more and abuse the drug at an increasingly higher dosage. Some of the emotional, physical, and psychological signs of benzo addiction include:

  • Anxiety
  • Excessive sleep
  • Trouble concentrating
  • Hallucinations
  • Irritability
  • Lack of motivation
  • Blurred vision
  • Slurred speech
  • Breathlessness

The physical and psychological reactions of abusing benzos can have lasting effects. You may even experience paradoxical reactions, which have the opposite effect of the intended purpose of the drug, such as increased anxiety.

There’s no reason to sit and contemplate benzo addiction and detox. Seek help today at a benzo detox center in Florida.

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Benzo Addiction and Detox

Stopping benzo misuse on your own can be dangerous and put you more at risk for overdose. Due to the paradoxical reactions such as increased anxiety, benzo abusers are more likely to take more of the drug to stop the symptoms.

The withdrawal symptoms from benzo addiction and detox require medical attention and can include:

  • Constant nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Tremors
  • Psychosis
  • Depression
  • Anxiety or panic attacks
  • Suicidal thoughts
  • Overdose deaths

Benzos can be difficult to quit because of their high dependency. Due to the withdrawal symptoms above, it’s best to attend a medically supervised detox program at a drug detox center that includes medical doctors, nurses, psychiatrists, and therapists.

Benzo Addiction and Detox at Summit Detox

At Summit Detox, we help our patients detox from benzos in a medically safe environment. With a compassionate, experienced team of medical doctors, registered nurses, and addiction professionals, we will create an individualized treatment program to fit your needs. We are committed to helping you or your loved one complete the benzo detox process and begin the road to recovery. Other detox programs that go hand-in-hand with benzo addiction include:

When you’re considering benzo addiction and detox, we understand the challenges you may be facing and aim to not only help you detox from benzos, but also teach you about addiction so you can thrive in your addiction recovery. The journey to recovery begins the moment you contact Summit Detox. If you or your loved one is struggling with benzo addiction, call Summit Detox today at 866.341.0638.

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